Co-parenting can be a difficult process, especially if you and the other parent went through a high-conflict divorce. Even if the divorce was amicable, you are likely to face a learning curve. Co-parenting requires patience, open communication, and more patience.

Here are four common ways co-parenting often goes wrong.

1. There is a lack of trust

Your concern for your children is normal, but you should trust your ex-spouse. Unless your spouse proved to be a bad parent, you need to create a good environment for your children where you trust them with your spouse. Communicate with them, and ensure they are up to date with any events or schedules.

2. One parent does not follow the custody agreement

Co-parenting means you share your parenting duties, but these duties should only occur as described in the court-approved parenting plan. Breaking this agreement can lead to disputes and uneven environments for your children. Make sure that both you and your ex-spouse understand the parenting agreement.

3. Your parenting styles clash

Compromise on the parenting styles you and your ex-spouse have. While both parents are unique, it is important to have a cohesive environment so it is not too jarring for your children to move. Mainly, focusing on giving your children the best care is the best way to avoid clashes.

4. You jump to conclusions about your ex-spouse

Remain neutral if your children reveal negative things about your ex-spouse. Unless he or she is causing serious harm to your children, it is best to stay calm and tell your children you will communicate with your ex-spouse.

Being a co-parent is tough, but loving your children and raising them in a good environment is the best thing you can do.