Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation.

Brand

Criminal Defense & Family Law | Omaha, Nebraska

Talk To A Lawyer Today 402-513-0504

Talk To A Lawyer Today
402-513-0504

Aggressive
Representation

  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Child Custody
  4.  » Moving your child out of Nebraska after a divorce

Moving your child out of Nebraska after a divorce

On Behalf of | Mar 19, 2021 | Child Custody |

There are many reasons why a move out of your home state may make sense. When you are the custodial parent of your child, however, it may not be as simple as you would like it to be. Your child is less likely to have a close relationship with the other parent if he or she is across state lines, and a judge may flat out refuse your request to relocate your child.

If you share custody of your child with the other parent, a court will consider several factors to determine if relocation is in the best interest of the child.

Legitimate reasons to relocate your child

According to FindLaw experts, you must have a legitimate reason to move your child across state lines. Courts generally consider the following situations legitimate reasons:

  • You are moving to take advantage of a better job
  • You are moving due to remarriage
  • You are moving closer to your family to receive help taking care of your child

If you do not seek permission from the court and decide to move anyway, you can face severe penalties.

The role of the other parent in the decision

If the other parent objects to you moving your child out of Nebraska, you may have a hard time receiving approval from the court. The courts consider it to be in the best interest of your child for both biological parents to co-parent. Moving with your child may cause undue stress on the relationship your child has with the other parent.

If your child has no relationship with the other parent, however, his or her objections may not hold much weight in the eyes of the court.