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Can nesting help our divorcing family?

| Dec 15, 2020 | Family Law |

You might be in the process of divorcing your partner, but if you have children with him or her you are partners for life. It is highly likely that the courts will award joint custody, as this is generally in the best interest of the children.

However, joint custody comes with a host of challenges. One of which is figuring out a suitable family living arrangement. In response to these challenges, some families have opted for a bird nesting or nesting living arrangement. Nesting is when the parents move in and out of a family residence as per the parenting schedule and the kids remain in the same residence, Psychology Today says.

What problems does this solve? 

In the most common co-parenting arrangement, the children move back and forth between two residences. Nesting keeps the children in one residence. This makes it a great option at the beginning of divorce when the parents want space from each other but do not have concrete post-divorce living plans. Nesting allows the children to keep their routine intact while the divorce is going on.

Nesting can also be the only realistic option for a family to stay in an expensive area. Particularly if both parents work, they may not be able to sustain a presence in a pricey area as single income households. Nesting allows the children to stay in a familiar neighborhood with the schools they currently attend.

Where do the parents live?

In temporary nesting arrangements, it is not unusual for the off-duty parent to simply live with other friends or family. For longer-term arrangements, many families decide to maintain a separate apartment for the off-duty parent to live in when not in the family home.